Jamur Shimeji Klasifikasi

Jamur shimeji merupakan salah satu jenis jamur yang dapat dimakan diamana jamur shimeji memiliki rasa yang nikmat dan juga kandungan gizi yang sangat banyak yang dapat memberikan beberapa manfaat kesehatan bagi tubuh. Klasifikasi dari jamur Phytophthora infestans yaitu Domain: Eukaryota, Kingdom: Chromalveolata. Hypsizygus tesselatus ( Buna shimeji) is an edible mushroom native to East Asia. It is cultivated locally in temperate climates in Europe, North America and Australia and sold fresh in super markets. In nature, shimeji are gilled mushrooms that grow on wood. Most often the mushroom is found on beech trees, hence the common name, beech mushroom.

  1. Jamur Enoki Klasifikasi
  2. Klasifikasi Jamur Shimeji
Hypsizygus tessellatus
Scientific classification
Kingdom:Fungi
Division:Basidiomycota
Class:Agaricomycetes
Order:Agaricales
Family:Lyophyllaceae
Genus:Hypsizygus
Species:
Binomial name
Hypsizygus tesselatus
(Bull.) Singer (1947)[1]
Synonyms
  • Hypsizygus marmoreusPeck[2]
  • Pleurotus elongatipes(Peck) H.E.Bigelow[2]

Hypsizygus tesselatus (Buna shimeji) is an edible mushroom[2] native to East Asia. It is cultivated locally in temperate climates in Europe, North America and Australia and sold fresh in super markets. In nature, shimeji are gilled mushrooms that grow on wood. Most often the mushroom is found on beech trees, hence the common name, beech mushroom. They are often small and thin in appearance and popular in many nations across the world.[3]

Two variations are known:

  • Buna-shimeji (ja:ブナシメジ), Hypsizigus tessellatus, (Brown Beech Mushroom , Beech Mushroom, BeechBrown Clamshell Mushroom);
  • Bunapi-shimeji (ja:ブナピー), (White Beech Mushroom, White Clamshell Mushroom); bunapi was selected from buna-shimeji and registered by Hokto Corporation.

Cooking[edit]

Being tough when raw,[4] the Shimeji should be cooked, having a bitter taste when raw which disappears completely upon cooking. The cooked mushroom has a firm, slightly crunchy texture and a nutty flavor. Preparation makes the mushroom easier to digest. It is often eaten with stir-fried foods including wild game and seafood. It is used in soups, stews and sauces. When prepared alone, Shimeji mushrooms can be sautéed as a whole, including the stem or stalk (only the very end cut off), using a higher temperature; or, they can be slow roasted on a low temperature with a small amount of butter or cooking oil. Shimeji is used in soups, nabe and takikomi gohan.

Gallery[edit]

  • Wild species. (Japan.)

  • Bunapi (Hokto Ltd. develops)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^http://www.mycobank.org/name/Hypsizygus%20tessulatus&Lang=Eng
  2. ^ abcMiller Jr., Orson K.; Miller, Hope H. (2006). North American Mushrooms: A Field Guide to Edible and Inedible Fungi. Guilford, CN: FalconGuide. p. 156. ISBN978-0-7627-3109-1.
  3. ^'Brown Beech Mushroom - Hypsizygus Tesselatus.' Brown Beech Mushroom - Hypsizygus Tesselatus. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Dec. 2014.
  4. ^Phillips, Roger (2010). Mushrooms and Other Fungi of North America. Buffalo, NY: Firefly Books. p. 238. ISBN978-1-55407-651-2.

External links[edit]

  • Honshimeji Mushroom, RecipeTips.com. Brown Beech (Buna shimeji), White Beech (Bunapi shimeji), and the Pioppino (Agrocybe aegerita) mushrooms.
  • Bunashimeji and Bunapi, Hokuto Corporation.
Retrieved from 'https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hypsizygus_tessellatus&oldid=1020794260'
Japanese popular mushrooms, clockwise from left, enokitake, buna-shimeji, bunapi-shimeji, king oyster mushroom and shiitake (front).
Lyophyllum shimeji
Bunapi (developed by Hokuto Corporation)

Shimeji (Japanese: シメジ, 占地 or 湿地) is a group of edible mushrooms native to East Asia, but also found in northern Europe.[1]Hon-shimeji (Lyophyllum shimeji) is a mycorrhizal fungus and difficult to cultivate. Other species are saprotrophs, and buna-shimeji is now widely cultivated. Shimeji is rich in umami-tasting compounds such as guanylic acid, glutamic acid, and aspartic acid.[2]

Species[edit]

Several species are sold as shimeji mushrooms. All are saprotroph except Lyophyllum shimeji.

Klasifikasi
Mycorrhiza
  • Hon-shimeji (ホンシメジ), Lyophyllum shimeji
The cultivation methods have been patented by several groups, such as Takara Bio[3] and Yamasa,[4] and the cultivated hon-shimeji is available from several manufacturers in Japan.[5][6]

Jamur Enoki Klasifikasi

Saprotroph
  • Buna-shimeji (ブナシメジ, lit. beech shimeji), Hypsizygus tessellatus, also known in English as the brown beech or brown clamshell mushroom
Hypsizygus marmoreus is a synonym of Hypsizygus tessellatus. Cultivation of Buna-shimeji was first patented by Takara Shuzo Co.,Ltd. in 1972 as hon-shimeji and the production started in 1973 in Japan.[7] Now, several breeds are widely cultivated and sold fresh in markets.
  • Bunapi-shimeji (ブナピー), known in English as the white beech or white clamshell mushroom
Bunapi was selected from UV-irradiated buna-shimeji ('hokuto #8' x 'hokuto #12') and the breed was registered as 'hokuto shiro #1' by Hokuto Corporation.[8][9]
  • Hatake-shimeji (ハタケシメジ), Lyophyllum decastes
  • Shirotamogidake (シロタモギダケ), Hypsizygus ulmarius
These two species had been also sold as hon-shimeji.
  • Velvet pioppino (alias velvet pioppini, black poplar mushroom, Chinese: 茶樹菇/茶树菇), Agrocybe aegerita

Cooking[edit]

Shimeji should always be cooked: it is not a good mushroom to serve raw due to a somewhat bitter taste, but the bitterness disappears completely upon cooking. The cooked mushroom has a pleasant, firm, slightly crunchy texture and a slightly nutty flavor. Cooking also makes this mushroom easier to digest. It works well in stir-fried foods, as well as with wild game or seafood. Also it can be used in soups, stews and in sauces. When cooked alone, Shimeji mushrooms can be sautéed whole, including the stem or stalk (only the very end cut off), using a higher temperature or they can be slow roasted on a low temperature with a small amount of butter or cooking oil. Shimeji is used in soups, nabe and takikomi gohan.[citation needed]

Klasifikasi Jamur Shimeji

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Shimeji.
  1. ^Hon Shimeji located in Sweden - http://www.spiegel.de/wissenschaft/natur/0,1518,703531,00.html (German) - retrieved June 30, 2010
  2. ^(in Japanese)Hyoeiオリジナルコラム(なでしこ通信) 日本人はキノコが大好きArchived 2007-12-13 at the Wayback Machine, Hyogo NCC College.
  3. ^METHOD FOR ARTIFICIALLY CULTURING LYOPHYLLUM SHIMEJI, TAKARA AGURI KK, JP2001120059. ARTIFICIAL CULTIVATION METHOD OF LYOPHYLLUM SHIMEJI, TAKARA BIO INC, JP2007143565.
  4. ^NEW STRAIN OF LYOPHYLLUM SHIMEJI AND USE OF THE SAME, YAMASA SHOYU KK, JP2006271234. METHOD FOR ARTIFICIALLY CULTURING LYOPHYLLUM SHIMEJI AND CULTURE MEDIUM, Yamasa Shoyu KK, JP2007054044.
  5. ^(in Japanese)雪国本しめじArchived 2007-12-15 at the Wayback Machine, Yukiguni Maitake Co.,Ltd.
  6. ^(in Japanese)ヤマサほんしめじ, Yamasa Corporation.
  7. ^(in Japanese)Hypsizigus marmoreus - 長期利用微生物参考データ(食品工業利用微生物), Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, Japan.
  8. ^Bunashimeji and BunapiArchived 2007-12-16 at the Wayback Machine, Hokuto Corporation.
  9. ^(in Japanese)ホクト白1号菌 (第13294号)[permanent dead link], Plant Variety Protection, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (Japan).

External links[edit]

  • Honshimeji Mushroom, RecipeTips.com. Brown Beech (Buna shimeji), White Beech (Bunapi shimeji), and the Pioppino (Agrocybe aegerita) mushrooms.
Retrieved from 'https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Shimeji&oldid=1026947184'